Humans Of Jinja, Uganda

From houses of worship, to shacks in the slum, to my host’s home in the outskirts, to the snazzy mall in the middle of the city, I had explored Kampala.

Now it was time to get to my next city, Jinja.

map kampala to jinja

A hop, skip, and a leap away from Kampala, I got on a dalla dalla (public transport van) and headed on over.

***

Jinja is a city of 70-80,00 people. There’s a lot of poverty; there’s a lot of beauty. The Nile River starts here. Young travelers come to raft the Nile’s whitewater nearby. Other Westerners are in town for development work and were seen at the coffee shops and more expensive restaurants. These locations are dotted within the rest off Jinja, a small third world city of which you’ll now see how the people live.

We start on the way from Kampala and Jinja:

DSC05288

Also on the way, stops featured the company of streetside sales folks.

DSC05289
“You want fried banana?”

Getting into Jinja, my motorcycle taxi dropped me off here:

DSC05297

Then I walked about its downtown.

DSC05303

DSC05306

DSC05299
I saw these interesting wheel barrows around.

A new market was under construction:

DSC05304

Until it’s ready, old markets will have to do.

DSC05305

 

Watch downtown come alive:

 

To the old market:

DSC05309

DSC05310

DSC05313

DSC05314

Big filet o' fish back there. Jinja is also on Lake Victoria, which supplies tilapia and Nile perch.
Big filet o’ fish back there. Lake Victoria supplies tilapia and Nile perch.

B

E

 

F

O

R

W

A

R

N

E

D

.

 

T

H

I

S

 

N

E

X

T

 

P

I

C

T

U

R

E

 

M

A

Y

 

D

I

S

T

U

R

B

 

Y

O

U

.

 

DSC05324
Cow head

Footage of market:

 

Getting back outside:

DSC05320

DSC05334
Like Tanzania, a mix of Christians and Muslims in Uganda

DSC05344

Here’s what I ate for lunch:

DSC05348
Street food: beef, rice, and yam

Getting my food:

 

Wandering away from town, I stumbled upon a housing park.

DSC05336

DSC05335

DSC05340

These homes aren’t much, yet infinitely better than the situation I encountered at night.

Within the dark of Jinja presented perhaps its darkest side.

DSC05516

I don’t know where these boys came from, as I didn’t notice them all day. But at night they come out when the sidewalks are empty, and lay their heads to rest with bodies wrapped in rice sacks.

My host in Mwanza, Tanzania worked with local runaway and homeless youth. We even hear about the problem in the US from time to time. Young people in bad domestic situations gravitate toward urban areas no matter where you are in the world. I suppose this is because they stand a better chance living off the pity of strangers.

DSC05520

No place in the world is without its problems of broken families and lost youth. But in an economically undeveloped place like Uganda, the problem is more pronounced.

I ended the day with some more street food.

Egg and veggies fried and wrapped in a chapati
Fried egg and veggies wrapped in flour chapati

***

My stop in Jinja wasn’t just to check out the lives of the people here. I had made a connection eight months earlier in Minneapolis that I was to fulfill the following day.

A father, his sons, and their fish farming operation at the headwaters of the Nile.

What say you?